Follow

Christina Chwyl  Art 

 

IS VEGANISM EXTREME?

Dr. Greger's "How Not to Die" is a scientifically backed MUST read on how to optimize your diet so that you can prevent, reduce, and even reverse America's leading killers. 

Have you ever seen advertisements for fresh produce, sweet potatoes or beans? Unfortunately, there's no money in the whole-foods market, and so our media promotes meat, dairy, fast food and pills.  Food industries even pay the American Dietetic Association $20,000 per diet fact sheet they help draft.

What's the cost to us? Let's look at meat. In one study, people who once ate vegetarian diets, but then started eating meat again, experienced an ~150% increase in risk for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. In another study, 3 months of whole-food, plant-based nutrition boosted activity in an enzyme that promotes telomere growth (the protective cap on chromosomes thought to reflect cellular aging). Even five years later, the whole foods eaters had longer telomeres. 

Overall, there's a wealth of evidence in this book on how a plant-based whole foods diet can save your life, as well as your loved ones. I'm not going to lie... I'm a bit of a vegan junk food addict,  but this book is inspiring me to add more nutritious foods (like this yummy apple/spinach/lemon/coconut water smoothie pictured above) into my life. 

 

IS VEGANISM EXTREME?

Dr. Greger's "How Not to Die" is a scientifically backed MUST read on how to optimize your diet so that you can prevent, reduce, and even reverse America's leading killers. 

Have you ever seen advertisements for fresh produce, sweet potatoes or beans? Unfortunately, there's no money in the whole-foods market, and so our media promotes meat, dairy, fast food and pills.  Food industries even pay the American Dietetic Association $20,000 per diet fact sheet they help draft.

What's the cost to us? Let's look at meat. In one study, people who once ate vegetarian diets, but then started eating meat again, experienced an ~150% increase in risk for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. In another study, 3 months of whole-food, plant-based nutrition boosted activity in an enzyme that promotes telomere growth (the protective cap on chromosomes thought to reflect cellular aging). Even five years later, the whole foods eaters had longer telomeres. 

Overall, there's a wealth of evidence in this book on how a plant-based whole foods diet can save your life, as well as your loved ones. I'm not going to lie... I'm a bit of a vegan junk food addict,  but this book is inspiring me to add more nutritious foods (like this yummy apple/spinach/lemon/coconut water smoothie pictured above) into my life.